Keeping Sunday Holy in a time without Mass

March 2020 – This will be a Lent we all remember. In the midst of the growing spread of COVID-19, which the World Health Organization has described as a global pandemic, all Sunday and weekday Masses have been suspended in Archdiocese of Detroit and in many other local churches, including the churches of our Chaldean brothers and sisters in Metro Detroit.

For many of us, Sunday Mass is a staple of our week and our spiritual life. We look forward to Sunday as a day of rest and a day to worship God in the way most pleasing to him, in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Less than one year ago, our local shepherd released a pastoral note titled The Day of the Lord. This was an encouragement and a challenge to us to live Sunday as a something different, as something holy. When it is not possible for us to participate at Mass, how can we still keep holy the Lord’s Day?

1. Watch a livestream of the Mass
Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron will be livestreaming Mass without a congregation from the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament at 12 p.m. every Sunday. Gather as a family or by yourself, and watch the Mass.

While digital participation can never replace actual presence at Mass, livestream Mass is a great way of keeping our connection with the Mass when it is not possible to be there in person. We can make an offering in our heart to be united spiritually to this offering, which is more spiritually efficacious than any other prayer. We should silence our phones, eliminate (as best we can!) distractions in our home, and try to give all of our attention to what is happening at the Mass so we can fully participate in this remote way.

There are several ways to watch Mass on TV or through the internet such as EWTN and Catholic TV Network. Numerous places, such as Mary’s Shrine in Washington, D.C., local churches (St. Vincent Pallotti Parish) and the Solanus Casey Center are offering livestream Masses as well.

2. Make a spiritual communion
An ancient practice of the Church for those who cannot be present at Mass is to make a spiritual communion. We have a simple prayer you can pray with longing in your heart to be united to Jesus. I know many who are too ill to attend Mass regularly, imprisoned, or in places where they are prevented from participating at Mass because of persecution or a shortage of priests have the regular practice of making a weekly — or daily — spiritual communion.

A Prayer for Spiritual Communion

“My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the Most Holy Sacrament. I love you above all things and I desire to receive you in my soul. Since I cannot at this moment receive you sacramentally, Come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace you as if you were already there and unite myself wholly to you. Never permit me to be separated from you. Amen.”

3. Read the Sunday readings as a family
These can easily be found at usccb.org/bible by clicking on “Today’s Readings.” Magnificat (a daily prayer book) is also offering free digital resources during this time, including the Sunday readings and a reflection.

Reading Scripture individually or together with others — especially in our families — is an excellent spiritual practice. In fact, Archbishop Vigneron’s pastoral letter, Unleash the Gospel, calls for Catholics to “commit to forming your family in the love and power of sacred Scripture by placing it at the center of your family life. Study and reflect on Scripture, especially on the Sunday readings.”

One easy way to do this is through a new resource called “52 Sundays.” You can find discussion questions (and a whole lot more) to spark a conversation in your family or with others about the Gospel reading. By thinking about the readings, asking questions, and listening to how God might respond in your heart, the Sunday readings can provide spiritual nourishment to you and your loved ones. During this time of “social distancing,” you could also reach out to a friend from church to have this conversation together.

4. Check in on those around you
Because those who are older are most susceptible to complications from COVID-19, health official are encouraging them to minimize their time away from home. It is a great act of charity to reach out to these brothers and sisters in our faith communities to check in on them with a simple phone call. Do they need groceries or help with something in their homes? Caring for each other — especially those who are most vulnerable during this time — is a demand of the Gospel. It is the enactment of our life as joyful missionary disciples.

5. Pray a family Rosary
Unleash the Gospel also calls for families to reclaim the Rosary as a way to be united to Mary, the Mother of Jesus and the Mother of the Church. She is the perfect model of a disciple and our great intercessor.

Fr. Stephen Pullis is director of the Archdiocese of Detroit’s Department of Evangelization and Missionary Discipleship.

Cancellation of Religious Education and other events…

March 13, 2020

To ensure the safety and health of those in our community during the Coronavirus pandemic, we have the following information to share with you:

Effective immediately the cancelling of…

Religious Education classes until Tuesday, April 14.

The Children’s Play Group that meets the 3rd Tuesday of the month, (March 17).

Irish Concerts – March 13 and March 15 at St. Patrick Church

KofC Corned Beef & Cabbage dinner – March 15

D.I.A.C. St. Joseph Feast Day celebration – March 22

 

As of today, March 13, we are still hosting tonight’s Soup and Salad at 5:00 pm; Stations of the Cross at 6:30 pm and the weekend masses.

Please check back on our website or parish app for further announcements as they become available to us from the Archdiocese of Detroit.

God bless you and your family, hoping everyone stays safe during these days ahead.

 

Coronavirus Precautions

March 11, 2020 –

As a Church, one of our sacred duties is to look after the health and safety of the community in our parishes and schools. Part of that duty is to help prevent and respond to infectious diseases that may be in the community.

In light of growing concerns about the coronavirus and its effects on those who have contracted the disease, we ask each of our parishes and schools to implement the following precautionary measures to help prevent the transmission of any virus.

FOR PARISHES:
  • Urge the faithful to stay home from Mass if they are experiencing any signs of illness. Ensure your community that in this cold/flu season, and especially in light of concerns about coronavirus, an individual does not commit any sin by avoiding Mass to protect others from the potential spread of illness.
  • For those who do attend Mass, we recommend congregations suspend the practice of shaking hands during the Sign of Peace or elsewhere, and of holding hands during the Our Father.
  • We recommend emptying (and cleaning) all holy water fonts.
  • We recommend our parishes suspend offering parishioners the Cup of the Most Precious Blood during Holy Eucharist, out of an abundance of caution. If this is a regular practice at your parish, it may help to remind the faithful that the Consecrated Host is the full Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ, meaning an individual does not need to receive from the Cup in order to achieve full Communion with Christ.
  • The Office of Christian Worship has provided prayer resources including a prayer for the sick, a prayer for an end to the coronavirus and information on Acts of Spiritual Communion for those unable to attend Mass

Coronavirus Preparedness Recommendations

Letter from Fr. Jeffrey Day

Archdiocese of Detroit

February 28, 2020

Dear Fathers,

As a Church, one of our sacred duties is to look after the health and safety of the community gathered each day for worship and prayer in our parishes. Part of that duty is to help prevent and respond to infectious diseases that may be in the community. In light of growing concerns about the coronavirus and its effects on those who have contracted the disease, we ask each of our parishes to implement the following precautionary measures to help prevent the transmission of any virus:

• Urge the faithful to stay home from Mass if they are experiencing signs of illness. Ensure your community that in this cold/flu season, and especially in light of concerns about coronavirus, an individual does not commit any sin by avoiding Mass to protect others from potential spread of illness.
• For those who do attend Mass, we recommend congregations suspend the practice of shaking hands during the Sign of Peace or elsewhere, and of holding hands during the Our Father.
• We recommend emptying (and cleaning) all holy water fonts.
• We recommend our parishes suspend offering parishioners the Cup of the Most Precious Blood during Holy Eucharist, out of an abundance of caution. If this is a regular practice at your parish, it may help to remind the faithful that the Consecrated Host is the full Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ, meaning an individual does not need to receive from the Cup in order to achieve full Communion with Christ.

Click here for more suggestions and information about the coronavirus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Please know that the Archdiocese of Detroit has been, and will continue to, monitor news concerning the coronavirus. We are preparing for any potential impact on our parishes, schools, and other ministries, and will follow any recommendations from local, state and federal officials. In the event that the virus is detected locally, we will communicate detailed plans and provide further assistance.

Fraternally yours in Christ

Fr. Jeff Day
Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia

Archdiocese of Detroit

 

St. John Paul II Classical Catholic School – Open for registration!

Welcome to the St. John Paul II Classical Catholic School for the upcoming 2019/2020 school year!

Located in Lincoln Park next to Christ the Good Shepherd Catholic Church on Riverbank.

This classical approach to education is conveniently laid  out in three stages of development known collectively as the Trivium (Latin for “a meeting of three roads”), which are grammar, logic and rhetoric. The study of Latin, art and music are integrated throughout all three stages of the Trivium.

These foundations of classical education successfully equip young people to faithfully navigate today’s secular and rapidly changing world.

Whether you are new to the community and thinking about your children receiving a Catholic education, or currently have children at St. John Paul II School, we welcome you explore this new approach in the classical school way.

Visit the website at www.jp2catholic.com for registration forms and more details!

 

Unleash the Gospel – Prayer for the Next Phase

Light most blessed, shine with grace
In our hearts most sacred place,
Fill your faithful through and through!
Left without your presence here,
Life itself would disappear,
Nothing thrives apart from you!Pentecost Sequence
Twelfth Century

Prayer for the Next Phase of Unleash the Gospel

Heavenly Father,
Thank you for the abundant graces of Synod 16:
for awakening in us the vision
and resolve to become again your Church on mission,
eagerly working together to “make disciples of all nations,”
according to our commission from the Lord Jesus.Pour out upon us your Holy Spirit, as at a new Pentecost,
to guide us in our next phase
in our movement to Unleash the Gospel.
By his power at work in us, transform our parishes
into bands of joyful missionary disciples.

Come Holy Spirit:
Set our hearts on fire to share the Good News of Jesus
with all those who stumble in darkness,
who hunger for hope, who thirst for eternal life.
Above all, grant us the boldness and courage of the apostles
to put the mission above all else, so that our community becomes
the spark to ignite the fire of divine love
that transforms this time and place
into the Kingdom of Heaven.

We pray through the intercession of
Our Lady, Star of the New Evangelization,
and her mother, our Patron, St. Anne;
and in the spirit of Blessed Solanus
we thank ahead of time
for “accomplishing in us far more than all we ask or imagine.”

We ask all of this in the all-powerful name of the Lord, Jesus Christ,
who lives and reigns forever. Amen.

Intercessions

For Archbishop Vigneron and the Unleash the Gospel Council, that the Holy Spirit showers them with a renewed fervor as they lead the Church of Detroit in a new Pentecost.

For the partner parishes in the Missionary Strategic Plan process and the Unleash the Gospel missionaries, that the Holy Spirit will inspire them to have a boldness in outreach that will bring faith in Jesus to all in their communities.

For families, singles and senior citizens, that the Holy Spirit will refresh and renew them in this season of grace and new growth.

 

Fr. John Casey SAC – returns to Ireland

Special thanks to Fr. John for the time he spent with us at St. Vincent Pallotti Parish while he was here in Wyandotte, at the Pallottine Mission House. Fr. John helped celebrate the masses, confessions and on the grief support ministry.

Fr. John is home now in Ireland relaxing and enjoying the beauty of his homeland. If you’d like to send Fr. John a note, he would love to hear from you.

Fr. John Casey SAC

Pallottine College

Kickham Street

Thurles, Co. Tipperary

Ireland

Fr. Noel O’Connor SAC Funeral in Ireland

Homily for the funeral Mass

by Fr. Derry

Ireland, 16th of May, 2019 – A very warm welcome to our Community chapel, we gather here several times daily to pray and to celebrate Mass. We are gathered for our final Mass in Noel’s presence here on earth.

Today we celebrate his life, a life well lived; and we celebrate his death, which he went to with faith and trust; in this our funeral Mass. The Mass is the great sacrifice of Jesus Christ and is the bedrock of our Catholic faith, and it is right that we celebrate today our Mass of thanksgiving for Noel, for his person, for his life and for all he was to us and for others. We had a gathering in Noel’s presence in our chapel in Dundrum on Tuesday evening and I was struck by the sharing of Noel’s brothers and sisters and how the words “thank you Noel”, were repeated time and again.

Noel was born on 17th December 1952 into a faith-filled family and faith was to be central to him and to his life. What can I say about Noel? Well, lots, as all of us who are gathered here could say about him. Yesterday Noel’s sister Anna was telling her sister Rachel of the gathering in Dundrum on Tuesday and she said, with a smile, “we canonized Noel last night”, and as we all smiled, she added “we knew the complete Noel, faults and all”; as did we his Pallottine family. A few weeks ago a mutual friend on hearing that Noel was not well sent me an e-mail and he wrote “Noel is a living saint as far as we were concerned even though he has his faults but he was a true missionary”, and there is truth in this affirmation, Noel was saintly, however there was the lived day to day life of family and of life in the Pallottine community with his faults and failings. If I were to pull both of these together, I would summarize and say Noel was a man of Faith. He had a deep, unshakeable, unbreakable faith in God. He sought God everywhere. He had a great appetite for the things of God, and Noel’s faith deepened, matured and was refined by suffering, his own, and that of others, but it did not waver. In his six years of living with brain cancer he lived by faith. We lived with him, and he never complained, never ever, occasionally he would wince at loud noises, or banging doors, because he had a sore head after the surgeries, but no complaints.

Noel’s faith was his belief in God, his continuous openness to God, his search for God – in prayer, in the Word of God, in the various Church movements in which he participated over the years, in the Sacraments, and in all of life and ministry he sought God. Noel’s faith in God morphed into knowledge that God is; God is person; God was life giving to him and with him. It is true to say that faith is a gift, but Noel ‘worked on it’ and sought an ever-deeper faith; and all of us learnt from that.

Secondly Noel was a man of integrity, of great personal integrity and probity, and this was shown in how he related to others and to life situations. We would joke about Noel being ‘a bit of an operator’ and a ‘bit of a gangster’, and he could be, but always what he looked for was for others, and never for Noel himself.

Thirdly in Noel’s life there were no half measures, he gave all, and in a sense he burnt himself out in a life of service and of hard work.

The readings chosen for today’s funeral Mass speak to us of Noel and his Christian life. The first reading from the Old Testament, from the Book of Wisdom was read by his niece Lisa; it is a reading that we have heard so often at funerals, but what is expressed in it is so true of Noel. The souls of the virtuous are in the hands of God; they did appear to die, their going looked like a disaster … but they are in peace … their hope was rich with immortality … they were tried by suffering, tried like gold in a furnace, purified, and accepted by God. Yes, it is true that Noel was too young to die, too strong to die, but as the reading affirms his going from us is not annihilation and he is in peace.

The Psalm was Lay Your hand gently upon us O Lord, a prayer of petition and trust sung beautifully by Rachel.

The second reading read by Noel’s niece Ashling is from chapter 8 of St Paul’s letter to the Romans, a passage that Noel loved. St Paul writes of his own experience, of the unbreakable bond between him and Jesus Christ, which Noel hungered for in life and which became his experience and his conviction, nothing could, or did, separate him from God in Jesus Christ.

The Gospel reading is from Chapter 5 of the Gospel of St Matthew, the beatitudes, with the repetition ‘blessed are … happy are … the’; and if you go through them one by one then you can tick them off, one by one, because Noel modelled himself on the heart of Jesus and here we have expressed the heart of Jesus; and Noel lived these, imperfectly, but he lived them. ‘Happy are the poor in spirit’ and Noel was poor in spirit; happy the gentle, Noel was gentle, happy those who mourn … happy those who hunger and thirst for what is right … happy the merciful … happy the pure in heart … happy the peacemakers … happy are you who are persecuted in the cause of right … Noel lived these, imperfectly, but he lived them, he hungered for justice, he was merciful and compassionate, Noel had a pure heart all through life, Noel was a peacemaker, in his family and certainly in our Pallottine community, Noel strove for what is right.

Noel has left a legacy, though not a whole lot of material goods because he had very little and what is there probably came from others anyway – he would go away for a few days to visit one of the family and take with him a little plastic bag and arrive back with perhaps a new jacket, shirts, a jumper, trousers and more. His legacy to us is the lived life of a man of faith and what faith in God becomes in a lived life. His legacy is the good which lives on and the happy and grateful memories that are lasting.

To us Pallottines his legacy is his commitment to and his dedication to our Pallottine community and to our work and life. JJ will speak to us later of what he left to his family.

We have been overwhelmed with the messages we have received in these days, text messages, WhatsApp messages, e-mails, phone calls and the assurance that there are many masses being celebrated for Noel all around the world. There will be a memorial Mass in Wyandotte, Michigan, on Friday 24th May at 7pm; perhaps we can join spiritually with those gathered there that day.

Noel was born on 17th December 1952 and was baptised on the 20th. He was confirmed on 2nd May 1965. He entered our Pallottine community as a postulant in September 1967, he made his first Pallottine consecration on 12th September 1974, his perpetual consecration on 4th June 1977 and was ordained deacon shortly afterwards and was ordained to the priesthood on 10th June 1978. He died on 13th May; the feast of Our Lady of Fatima, and his brother Tom who arrived a few short minutes after Noel had died commented how appropriate it was that he die on that feast day as his mother had a great devotion to Our Lady of Fatima.

Noel was a faithful missionary disciple; may he enjoy the eternal presence of God.

Fr Derry Murphy, SAC.

Fr. Noel O’Connor SAC – RIP 12/17/52 – 5/13/19

A message from Fr. Michael L. Cremin SAC …

Co. Dublin, Ireland – It is with great sadness and sorrow that we heard of Fr. Noel’s death on Monday, May 13, Feast Day of Our Lady of Fatima. He died in Blackrock Hospice, Co. Dublin, Ireland, surrounded by his family, along with Fr. Derry Murphy SAC, our Provincial Rector and Fr. Michael Irwin SAC.

As many of you know, Fr. Noel had been battling a second brain tumor over the last few years and went back to Ireland 16 months ago to be near his own family. During that time apart from ongoing treatments, he was able to go fishing with family and friends to some of his favorite fishing spots.

While Fr. Noel lived here with us in Wyandotte, he served as Mission Director at the Pallottine Mission House, assisted at our parish and neighboring parishes and worked at our local Wyandotte Hospital as Chaplain. He was highly respected as a very caring pastoral priest and sought out by many for one to one counseling and spiritual direction. He lived a very simple priestly life and strove to provide as much material help to those he served on the missions in East Africa for over 26 years.

Fr. Noel was an example to us all of holiness and detachment. We are consoled in knowing that his suffering is over and that he now enjoys a tremendous reward with the communion of saints in heaven. May God bless him with great peace and rest. Amen.

A Memorial Mass and Celebration of Life will be held on Friday, May 24 at 7:00 p.m. at St. Joseph Church, 344 Elm Street, Wyandotte.

       

                

Catholic Goods Store

135 Superior Blvd., Wyandotte

Located in the school offices of the old St. Patrick School building.

If you haven’t stopped by our store recently, you will be surprised by the items that are available. Missal sets, rosaries, First Communion gifts, Confirmation gifts, Easter items and cards, statues, books, prayer cards and other religious items.

Hours: Saturday 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm; Sunday 9:30 am to 11:00 am; Wednesday 12:30 to 1:00 pm.

For more information, call the store manager at 313-802-5934.