EWTN Pallottines in Africa Documentary

From March 1st through March 6th EWTN will be airing the Irish Pallottines in Africa Documentary. Learn about the Irish Pallottines, a Catholic apostolate working in 45 countries, where the priests, seminarians, and lay people meet the daily needs of East Africa’s rural parishes. A special look with Fr. George Damball, who works tirelessly with the people in his parish in rural Tanzania, and was the first ordained African priest of the Irish Pallottine Order in East Africa.

  • Video Length is 30 minutes.
  • Airs at 5:30 PM
  • CC Support
  • Rated TV-G

Click Here, to go to EWTN’s Television Schedule.

Click Here, to support the Irish Pallottines directly!

 

If you are interested in purchasing this Documentary:

 

Happy Cookers Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner!

St. Vincent Pallotti Parishes own Happy Cookers are excited to announce carry out Corned Beef & Cabbage dinners. Made with Wigley’s famous corned beef, tender cabbage, carrots, onions, and delicious red-skin potatoes this meal is sure to satisfy! Served with Rye bread, a cookie, and lots of love! Dinners are $15 each and the purchase enters you into a chance to win one of five Raffle Baskets.

Pre-Order forms are now available through March 5th. Find the form Here(or click the image below), in church, or in the Parish office.

  • Pick up is March 14, 2021
  • The dinners are Carry out ONLY
  • No Walk-In orders will be accepted

Update from Archbishop Vigneron on the General Dispensation

In a letter to the faithful, Archbishop Vigneron announced that the general dispensation from the Sunday obligation will expire on March 13

Catholics who engage in other activities that would present a similar or greater risk of contamination (eating out at restaurants, traveling, non-essential shopping, widening one’s circle of contacts, etc.) should begin to return to Sunday Mass as they are able. Particular dispensations remain for those at greater risk of illness. The health and safety of our communities is and always will be paramount as we continue to closely monitor local conditions. For that reason, our churches will remain limited to 50 percent of available capacity for the near future and many other existing protocols will remain in place.

For more information, please visit https://www.aod.org/comehometohope

Letter from Archbishop Vigneron:

Dear Brothers,

The Sacred Liturgy, and particularly the Holy Eucharist, is the very heart and foundation of our Catholic faith. It is during the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass that the saving death and resurrection of Jesus is made present to us, our covenant with Our Lord is renewed, and God, in the person of Jesus Christ, comes to us and makes himself truly present for us in his Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity. It is an irreplaceable gift; a foretaste of Heaven itself.

When the pandemic first began, in the midst of tremendous uncertainty, it was necessary to suspend all public liturgies. During this time, we assessed the situation in light of public health information and explored a safe way to bring Christ to the people, both through the Word of God and the Sacraments. Given the gravity of the Sunday obligation to attend Mass, this decision was not undertaken lightly. Then, we cautiously returned to Mass with prudent restrictions, such as capacity limits and rigorous cleaning protocols, to allow for the resumption of essential public worship without undue risk of accelerating the pandemic. During these difficult months of pandemic, you, your parish coworkers, and those to whom you minister have adapted in order to ensure the health and well-being of everyone in our local communities. I want to offer my sincere gratitude for the efforts that have been undertaken to implement and maintain the first-rate precautionary measures that have kept our parishes and schools safe.

If you have not already done so, I encourage you to read the letter Cardinal Robert Sarah, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the Discipline of the Sacraments, sent to bishops in September of last year on the importance of public, communal worship in the life of the Church and the lives of the faithful. In particular, I wish to draw your attention to Cardinal Sarah’s reflection on the necessity of the celebration of the Eucharist — particularly in person.

As part of our adaptations, many of our parishes have broadcast Masses over the internet during these last several months. While this has been a means to help Catholics nourish their souls when they could not be present for Mass, we must remember that it cannot become the norm. As Cardinal Sarah reminds us, God did not come to us virtually. He came to us — and continues to come to us — in the flesh. As Catholics, unmediated contact with the Real Presence of the flesh and blood of Our Lord in offering this sacrifice to the Father is irreplaceable and essential. We recall Christ’s own words when he foretold the gift of the Holy Eucharist:

“Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day. For my flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me and I in him.” (John 6: 54-56)

In recognition of the essential and central nature of the Eucharist Sacrifice in our lives as Catholics, and in acknowledgement of my duty as shepherd to care for the souls of everyone within our diocese, it is important that I lead more of the faithful back to Mass, when and where possible. That is why the general dispensation from the Sunday obligation will be extended only for one month, until March 13. With its expiration, I intend to grant numerous particular dispensations to those in need. It is time for us to welcome back more of the faithful “with a renewed amazement, with an increased desire to meet the Lord, to be with him, to receive him and to bring him to our brothers and sisters with the witness of a life full of faith, hope and love.” (Cdl. Sarah).

Active participation in Mass is an occasion for all of us to avail ourselves of the immeasurable spiritual graces Christ desires for his faithful through his Paschal Sacrifice. We know that there remains the concern for spread of infection, particularly among the winter months when we live indoors to a greater degree. All of us must remain vigilant to limit its spread, particularly among those most vulnerable. With this in mind, I am granting particular dispensations from the obligation to attend Mass on Sunday and Holy Days of Obligation for people in certain circumstances, including those who are ill and those who care for anyone who is at-risk of serious complications from COVID-19. I am making a particular request that those who are ill or think they might be ill to refrain for this in-person participation in the liturgy as an act of justice and charity to others. Those who would experience significant anxiety or fear of getting sick from being in a public setting are similarly dispensed from their obligation to attend. More information about the particular dispensations can be found here (a downloadable PDF is also available).

In allowing the general dispensation to expire, we must welcome back to Mass all Catholics who have been engaged in other activities that would present a similar or greater risk of exposure, such as eating out at restaurants, traveling, partaking in non-essential shopping, and widening one’s circle of contacts. These individuals should also prepare to return to Mass in recognition of its preeminence in our lives as Catholics.

The health and safety of our communities is and always will be paramount as we continue to closely monitor local conditions. For that reason, I am continuing the liturgical directive that all the faithful present at Mass, with the exception of small children, wear a mask or face-covering. Additionally, our churches will remain limited to no more than 50 percent of available capacity for the near future, and many other existing protocols will remain in place. I am asking you, brothers, insofar as it is possible, to adjust Mass schedules or offer additional public Masses if your “normal” Mass schedule is truncated, to make it easier for as many of the faithful as possible to attend Mass while still practicing social distancing during the approaching Lenten and Easter seasons.

It is time, brothers, for us to send a message to our faithful about the centrality of the Eucharist in the life of us and our Church. Throw open your doors. Personally invite parishioners to return to Mass — especially those who may be anxious, discouraged, or who have been absent for an extended period of time. Also, please give attention to reopening Eucharistic Adoration chapels and returning to generous confession schedules. Jesus came to us in the flesh and he continues to come to us at every Mass. It is time for Catholics to come to him, to experience the awesome grace that is the Real Presence of Our Lord and Savior in his Paschal Mystery.

At the beginning of this pandemic, I entrusted the Archdiocese of Detroit to Our Lady of Lourdes, patroness for those who suffer illness, asking that, through her intercession, God would grant healing and protection to the people of southeast Michigan and beyond. I ask you, my brothers, to join me in offering prayers of thanksgiving to Our Blessed Mother for her intercession so far and to pray for her continued accompaniment. With her help, let us persevere in hope to face the challenges of this virus and continue to give witness to our confidence in the good news of the Lord’s victory over suffering and death.

With assurances of my prayers for you, I remain,

Fraternally yours in Christ,

The Most Revered Allen H. Vigneron
Archbishop of Detroit

Recent phishing/scam attempts

Most people are aware of phishing – or email scams – but they may not realize scammers can also target them with deceptive text messages sent to their smart devices. It’s called “smishing”: a mashup of SMS – for “short message service” – and phishing. Recently a decent number of our parishioners have been contacted by these scammers with the intent of obtaining Google Play Gift cards or iTunes cards. These messages or emails will often claim to be from Fr. Brendan or from someone working for Fr. Brendan.